Tag: Breastfeeding

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Baby Hunger and Fullness Cues

April 07, 2022

Even before your child can talk, he or she will show signs of hunger or fullness by using sounds and movements.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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How Much Should my Baby be Eating?

April 07, 2022

You may see different recommendations based on whether you choose to breastfeed or formula feed your baby. The most important thing to remember is that your baby’s feeding needs are unique.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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Medela Pump In Style with MaxFlow Now Available

April 06, 2022

Perfect For Moms Who Pump Several Times A Day!

Medela’s beloved Pump In Style® breast pump line is debuting a new member: The Pump In Style with MaxFlow™ Technology! This new pump is a double electric, single-user breast pump designed to maximize pumping efficiency.

Simply put: It’s a hardworking pump for hardworking moms, built on Medela’s 60-year commitment to moms to use research-driven innovative technology to help moms in their breastfeeding journey. Designed for the on-the-go mom, the new Pump In Style with MaxFlow Technology comes with everything you need to pump, including a closed system to keep tubing clean and free of milk and hospital performance to ensure you’re pumping as efficiently as possible.

  • Medela’s patented 2-Phase Expression with its new MaxFlow Technology that uses micro-vibrations to increase and optimize milk flow

  • Research-based breast shield design that’s more comfortable and helps mom produce 11.8% more milk than standard breast shields

  • Intuitive control panel simplifies pumping with pre-programmed settings that you can customize for your comfort and to match your baby’s nursing rhythm

  • Easy-to-clean construction with fewer parts to assemble and clean

  • Battery pack so you can pump anywhere, regardless of whether you have access to an outlet (batteries not included)

Highly Effective, Yet Easy To Use

Moms work hard all day, every day, and you don’t have time to set up, program and clean complicated breast pumps. That’s why Medela created the Pump In Style with MaxFlow, which maximizes your time and your pumping sessions. One of the quietest pumps available, the Pump In Style with MaxFlow features:

The Pump In Style with MaxFlow breast pump comes in two configurations:

  1. Pump In Style with MaxFlow: The standard version of the pump is usually fully covered by most insurance plans and comes with everything you need to pump, including one set of 24mm breast shields, two bottles and a battery pack. Click here to learn more about the standard pump.

  2. Deluxe Pump In Style with MaxFlow: This version is typically an upgraded breast pump, and the fee depends on your insurance coverage. The deluxe version includes the standard Pump In Style with MaxFlow Technology pump and also includes two sizes of breast shields (21mm and 24mm), five bottles, a stylish bag and a cooler. Click here to learn more about the deluxe pump.

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Basics of Breastfeeding

April 06, 2022

Expect breastfeeding to be a learning process. You and your baby are both learning; your baby is learning how to latch, suck, and swallow and you are learning your baby’s hunger cues, positioning for a proper latch, and managing your breast milk supply.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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Breast Milk Storage Guidelines

April 06, 2022

Not sure how to safely store breast milk at room temperature, in the fridge or freezer, or how long you can safely keep it?

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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Learn How to Get a Free Breast Pump

December 15, 2021

Planning for a new baby is expensive. Crib, diapers, car seat, stroller and more.

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, you can leave a breast pump off the registry. Most insurance companies now cover breast pumps at 100% when you use an approved supplier like EHCS.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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Can you get a free breast pump through Medicaid?

March 13, 2021

Sometimes determining if your Medicaid will cover your breast pump can seem confusing. Simple question, right? But the answer isn’t necessarily as easy.

Let Edwards Health Care Services help you determine your benefits and eligibility.

can you get a free breast pump through medicaid?

One easy way to find out is by completing our online application. EHCS will research your Medicaid plan and work with them to confirm your benefits and determine which breast pumps you’re eligible for.

You’d think that would be easy, but it’s not as black-and-white as you’d think. The Health Insurance Association of America says that Medicaid is a “governments-sponsored insurance program for individuals of any age whose resources and income are insufficient to cover health care.” Under the Affordable Care Act, you can qualify for Medicaid if you make less than 133 percent of the federal poverty line. Currently nearly 70 million people (or 1 in 5 Americans) are enrolled in a Medicaid plan or Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

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Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.


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How to Choose the Right Breast Pump

May 31, 2020

Choosing the right breast pump can seem overwhelming. Choosing your ideal breast pump is a decision best made after considering your needs and weighing all of the options.

Here are a few great questions to ask yourself to help choose the right breast pump for you.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Hunger cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Reaches for or points to food.
2. Opens his/her mouth when offered a spoon or food.
3. Gets excited when he/she sees food.
4. Uses hand motions or sound during feeding to let you know he/she is still hungry.

Fullness cues: 6 – 24 months

1. Pushes food away.
2. Closes his/her mouth when food is offered.
3. Turns his/her head away from food.
4. Begins to play with food.

It is important to listen to these hunger and fullness cues, and to let your child decide how much he/she wants to eat. If you are concerned about how much or how little your child is eating, speak to your pediatrician.


The information contained here within is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately. Edwards Health Care Services (EHCS) does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned here within. Reliance on any information provided by EHCS, EHCS employees, contracted writers, or medical professionals presenting content for publication here within is solely at your own risk.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW


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Home          Available Breast Pumps          Support for Moms          FAQs          Why Choose EHCS         


Check out the benefits of breastfeeding

January 14, 2019

Breastfeeding is the best way to provide essential nutrients while also bonding with your child. However, it’s unrealistic to think you’ll be with your baby 24/7.

Breastfeeding is linked to a lower risk of various health problems for babies along with others, learn more below.

Hunger cues: Birth – 6 months

From birth to 6 months old, your infant will progress through a series of signs showing that he/she is hungry. The typical progression is:
1. Begin smacking lips, clucking tongue, and opening closing his/her mouth in a sucking motion (even during sleep).
2. Rooting, turning his/her head toward caregiver, and opening/closing mouth in a sucking motion.
3. Bringing hands to mouth.
4. Clenching hands into fists and increase sucking on hands.
5. Beginning to show lines of stress in his/her face.
6. Beginning to cry.

It is important to note that crying is often a late sign of hunger. Look for signs 1-5 first to better anticipate your baby’s needs and begin feeding when he/she is still calm.

Fullness cues: Birth – 6 months

As your baby becomes full, you will notice the following signs:
1. The lines in baby’s face will begin to smooth out.
2. Hands that were tightly fisted and up near the cheeks will begin to slowly open. Arms will relax and drop to the sides.
3. Baby will no longer maintain a tight seal at breast or on the bottle, and milk will begin to leak at the corners of the mouth.
4. Baby will turn away from the feeding and refuse to re-latch onto your breast or the bottle.

It is important to note that if your baby has fallen asleep but still exhibits lines on the face or fisted hands, he/she is not yet full and will wake up shortly to re-feed. Take time to burp your baby, change his/her diaper and gently arouse him/her to complete the feeding.

Have more questions? Listen to our FREE podcast!

LISTEN NOW

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